University College London, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health

University College London (UCL) is London’s leading multidisciplinary university, and is now ranked among the top ten in the world by the Times Higher – QS World University Rankings. Its publications attract more citations from fellow researchers than any other university outside North America. UCL’s excellence extends across all academic disciplines and it has one of Europe’s largest and most productive centres for biomedical science. The Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (DEPH) is a thriving multidisciplinary department with epidemiology, statistics and sociology represented strongly.

Examples of the research carried out include: the Health Survey for England, the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), the Whitehall II study and the HAPIEE study. UCL DEPH has participated in several recent EU-funded projects such as CHANCES or INEQ-CITIES. UCL Department of Epidemiology and Public Health has previously, and is at present, involved in a number of international collaborations focusing on social inequalities in health and on healthy ageing (e.g. the Whitehall II, ELSA and HAPIEE studies). The Head of the Department, Professor Sir Michael Marmot, led the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH), the English Review of Health Inequalities, and is currently leading the WHO European Review of Social Inequalities in Health.

UCL will be directly responsible for research on Early Child Development as well as for the Case Studies and Recommendations. UCL is the project’s Scientific Lead, ensuring that the scientific work of the consortium is rigorous and meets expected quality standards.

Staff involved:

UCL-Sir_Michael_Marmot_125xxProfessor Sir Michael MARMOT: Head of the UCL Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and President of the British Medical Association, he has led a research group on health inequalities for 30 years. He has been PI of the Whitehall II Study investigating the striking inverse social gradient in morbidity and mortality since the beginning of the study, and leads the ELSA study of health, economic position and quality of life in ageing populations. In 2000 he was knighted for services to epidemiology and understanding of health inequalities. Internationally acclaimed, Professor Marmot is a Vice President of the Academia Europaea, a Foreign Associate Member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Chair of the WHO CSDH, and Chair of the Marmot Review of Health Inequalities set up by British government.

UCL_Peter-Goldblatt-125x125Professor Peter GOLDBLATT: Member of the Marmot Review team at UCL and Co-director of the Secretariat to European Review on Social Determinants and the Health Divide commissioned by WHO Euro. He was previously at the United Kingdom Office of National Statistics (ONS). While at the ONS, he was the Chief Medical Statistician from 1999 to 2008, principally concerned with leading analyses of health and demography.

Hynek xx187Dr Hynek PIKHART: Senior Lecturer on the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe study (HAPPIEE) focusing on determinants of health in transition countries of these regions. His main interests are understanding and explaining social variations in health in countries undergoing social and economic transition, and measuring socio-economic position in relation to health. He is also involved in the DG-SANCO INEQ-CITIES project.

UCL-JMorrison2-125x187Joana MORRISON: Research Assistant at the UCL Department of Epidemiology and Public Health for DRIVERS working on unequal child development. She previously collaborated in the DG-SANCO INEQ-CITIES project and the Spanish Medea Project describing inequalities in mortality in small areas. Her main interests are understanding the mechanisms underlying social health inequalities in different contexts as well as analysing intersectoral policies and interventions targeting the social determinants of health inequalities.

UCL_Milagros-Ruiz_smallMilagros RUIZ: Research Assistant in Social Epidemiology analysing social inequalities in early childhood health and development in Europe for DRIVERS. Her key interests lie in explaining health inequalities from a gender and life course perspective. Before starting her doctorate in the UCL Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, she worked in areas related to international science policy and women’s rights. She was previously engaged in the dissemination of findings from the DG-SANCO INEQ-CITIES project.